Mar 142014
 
Cyclone Evan courtesy NASA.gov

Cyclone Evan courtesy NASA.gov

As I’m writing this, Cyclone Lusi has just passed south of Fiji. The 19th tropical depression of the season is gathering power over Samoa and is supposed to form into a cyclone early next week. All these tropical lows send people running from Fiji down to New Zealand and Australia for the Summer. I myself spent 4 Summers in New Zealand following the prevailing wisdom. These notes are for those who aren’t wise, in the prevailing sense.

I’d unsuccessfully looked around online for advice on cruising Fiji during cruising season. I’ve know a few people in the past that have cruised the Mamanucas and Yasawas while keeping a reserved spot at Vuda Point Marina to fall back to in case of bad weather. There were also a good contingent of cruisers this year who kept moorings in Savusavu, but escaped out to Cousteau Resort for weeks at a time between lows.

Neither of these options really sounded good to me. I’d been to the Yasawas, and while they’re nice, I tend to stick to the less touristy spots. Instead I decided that I’d range out from Savusavu, coming back every 4-6 weeks to resupply.

I was worried about the heat. My buddy Grant on Lochiel had spent the 2012/2013 season in Vuda and cruising in the Yasawas. He assured me that the heat wasn’t that bad. As a point of fact, the weather was generally much nicer during cyclone season than during the cruising season. Average temperatures were in the low 30s as opposed to the high 20s in the Winter. It actually rained less between lows during cyclone season than during the cruising season. The water was still cool enough to be refreshing. My crew did rely pretty heavily on a spray bottle filled with water to keep her cooled off, but I generally found that ample fans and the occasional swim was enough to stay cool.

Mélanie regularly spraying herself down to cool off

Mélanie regularly spraying herself down to cool off

There was an amazing amount of lightning all season long. I always felt a bit exposed when I was the tallest point in the anchorage. I did see lightning hit a boat in Vuda a few years back, but didn’t hear of any boats getting hit this year. Just in case, I kept most of my electronics disconnected when I wasn’t using them. I don’t know if this would have helped in the event of a lightning strike, but it made me feel better.

I used a number “hurricane holes” in northern and eastern Fiji and have heard of a few more. Here’s my run down on the ones that I’ve actually been to.

Savusavu (16 46.6677 S 179 20.0401 E):
I normally pick up a Waitui mooring whenever I’m in Savusavu. Unfortunately none of the moorings West of the Copra Shed are really suitable as cyclone moorings. Their ground tackle might be fine, but the spot is too exposed. I was able to pick up one of Curly’s moorings for a 30 gusting 50 knot low that passed through. The winds started from the north, but then switched to the west blowing right up the anchorage. My spot right off the Surf and Turf was nice and calm while all hell was breaking loose further out, especially for the two boats in front of Waitui. Waitui Marina’s float was destroyed and much of the dock was wrecked as well.

Waves picking up, I didn't get any pics when it was really bad

Waves picking up, I didn’t get any pics when it was really bad

Asari and what remains of Waitui's dock

Asari and what remains of Waitui’s dock

One boat broke their mooring lines at Savusavu Marina and ended up on the beach. Fortunately it landed on a muddy spot and didn’t suffer much damage. The rest of the boats on Savusavu Marina moorings rocked and rolled a bit, but it wasn’t bad. By far the best moorings are the ones between Copra Shed and the end of town.

Mooring line fail

Mooring line fail

Unfortunately these moorings were all reserved by the beginning of cyclone season. In order to rely on Savusavu as a hurricane hole, you have to reserve and pay for a mooring for the whole season. For this reason, I only came to Savusavu for the one low and only because Deviant had left his mooring and gone to Vuda for a haul out, so I knew I’d have a spot.

There were two boats that anchored in the mangroves between town and Savusavu Marina. It’s a tough spot to get into, there’s no wind and there’s lots of bugs. That being said, both boats stayed there for free all through cyclone season.

Nasasobo (16 44.9492 S 179 51.1202 E):
Nasasobo is a fine spot, capable of handling more than a few boats. The entrance is small and is protected by a reef. Holding is fantastic in thick mud. Along the western side, it’s deep very close to the mangroves. William (one of the locals in Nasosobo) mentioned that one shoal draft cruising boat was able to make it up one of the creeks into the mangroves on a high tide, but scouting it in the dinghy I wasn’t able to find any areas deep enough to get Bodhran anywhere close to the creeks in the north east corner of the bay. For my money the best spot is tucked into the northwest corner, tied to the mangroves with a couple anchors out.

Nasasobo

Nasasobo

The problem with Nasosobo is that it’s reasonably big. Some good waves could build up inside the bay during a blow. It also doesn’t have an internet signal, so you can’t track what the storm is doing once you get set. You can pick up a signal from Taveuni out by the reef if the weather is good enough to take your dinghy.

Naiqaiqai Creek (16 43.3945 S 179 53.3833 E):
I used Naqaiqai when cyclone Ian was approaching from the southeast. Naqaiqai has a narrow entrance. It’s exposed to the north, but Kioa would break up some of the really big stuff coming down. The bay gets shallow pretty quickly, but I was able to make it more than half way up the bay anchoring in 10 feet of water over thick mud. It turned out that Ian did a 180 and hit Tonga instead, so I didn’t get hit by anything more than 25 knots. It looked deep enough close to the mangroves to get in and tie off, but I didn’t do it myself.

An added bonus to Naqaiqai is a weak internet signal. It wasn’t enough to surf the net, but it was just enough to download gribs and check email.

Nice tight entrance at Naqaiqai Creek

Nice tight entrance at Naqaiqai Creek

Qamea (16 45.8276 S 179 46.8308 W):
I didn’t actually go to Qamea during cyclone season, but I’d been there last year and it looks like a good anchorage. I’d like to get in and scout the creek going back to George’s house, but never got the chance. Still it’s a protected little spot with great holding. It’s open the west, but Taveuni would knock down anything really bad from that direction.

Navatu (16 55.4526 S 179 00.7386 E):
Navatu looked on the chart to be a sweet little spot. I tucked back in here when Cyclone Kofi was approaching. Unfortunately there are shoals everywhere in this bay. The only really usable areas are behind the island and the northeast corner. I chose to anchor behind the island. In order to get suitable cyclone scope, I had to tie off a line to a tree on the island to limit my swing. As the storm changed tacks, I ended up putting two more anchors out so that I didn’t end up caught beam to the wind. It turns out that when Kofi passed, I had southerly winds. My big anchors were out to the north and west where the earlier forecasts had the worst wind coming from. I rode out the 35 knot winds on a 25lb Danforth. It did have 100′ of chain on it and held like a champ, but it was discouraging to prepare so much and have the wind do the complete opposite.

Navatu has a strong 2G signal that you can browse the web with as well as track weather and emails. It worked well for me, but it couldn’t accommodate more than 2 cruising boats.

Wainaloka (17 44.1331 S 178 46.0009 E):
I ran to Wainaloka after being hit by a fresh northerly while I was anchored in Makogai. I’d heard that it was a hurricane hole and after a lively sail I anchored in the northeast corner of the bay in flat calm water. The holding is good and it’s possible to get fairly close the the mangroves, but Wainaloka is far too big for me to be comfortable using it as a hurricane hole. Moturiki would prevent any real big waves from coming it, but theres still more fetch to the west than I’d find acceptable.

An added bonus to Wainaloka was the ability to catch a truck into Levuka. We did a quick resupply here. There’s not much fresh stuff available during the week, but apparently theres more on Saturday. The truck comes by the village around 8:30am. If you miss it, there’s not another one. There’s also no traffic for hitching.

Another problem with Wainaloka is it’s lack of internet signal. Additionally you can’t get a signal by water until you get to the north end of Ovalau. You can get a signal in Levuka if you take a shore trip, but I don’t like being in the dark with a storm approaching.

Tivi (16 16.9973 S 179 28.7380 E):
I didn’t visit Tivi this year, but I anchored there last year and kept it in mind as a hurricane hole if I was on the north side of Vanua Levu. The entrance dog legs and is protected by a reef. Tuck into the little notch along the eastern side. The holding is thick mud and it’s deep right up to the mangroves.

Vuda (17 40.8718 S 177 23.1560 E):
I left my boat in Vuda for the 2012/2013 cyclone season. Vuda took a direct hit from Cyclone Evan which was a category 4 storm at the time. Boats in the pits suffered little to no damage. Boats in the water with their owners on board also fared quite well, generally suffering only minor damage. A 65′ ketch was put next to my 32 footer the day before Evan came through. The storm passed right over Vuda and the wind came from multiple directions. I didn’t suffer any damage from the 40′ boat on my port side, but the 65 footer blew down on me tearing up 15′ of cap rail, destroying 3 turnbuckles and bending my chainplates. He had also put a chain behind me to keep him off when the wind was blowing the other direction. When the wind shifted, he drove me down into that chain bending my stern pulpit and 2 stanchions.

Vuda Marina

Vuda Marina

My takeaway from Vuda is that it’s a good cyclone hole if you can get a pit or if you’re going to stay on the boat. The pits were all reserved this year in June a full 6 months before cyclone season. I wouldn’t leave my boat unattended in Vuda during cyclone season again.

Boats tucked nicely into their pits at Vuda

Boats tucked nicely into their pits at Vuda

In addition to the spots that I mentioned above, there are supposedly very good cyclone holes at the north end of Vanua Belavu, up the rivers in Denerau and Lautoka, and by the Tradewinds Hotel in Suva. I’ve never been to any of these spots, so I can’t comment on them, but I kept them in mind as I sailed around Fiji this season.

Cruising during cyclone season turned out pretty well for me. I only saw 2 other cruising boats outside of the Savusavu area. Vodafone’s coverage in Fiji is good enough that I rarely went without grib files. When I didn’t have internet access, I was still able to listen to the Rag of the Air most mornings. There are definitely risks to staying in the tropics during cyclone season, but it’s very possible to keep cruising and not bail down to New Zealand.

Here’s a gpx file with most of my tracks from Fiji: JasonsFiji.gpx

  3 Responses to “Cruising Fiji During Cyclone Season”

  1. Fabulous information. I am planning on staying in Fiji on my yacht Cachalot for cyclone season and this has given me exactly what I need to know. Thank you for sharing. Ally

  2. Thank you so much for such good sharing, Jason!

    Since you did so well, i will add a few more from my searching, below. But please note i on ly experienced what i said i did + i only share what others posted.

    For if we sell our sailboat in Oregon, US, we thinking to try again. For last time we sailed in we choose to go on to Australia for hurricane season. We had come from US + felt like we would just get settled in + have to move on w/weather. But i see in hindsight, good local knowledge would of helped.

    Life is short, we got to Auzie land + our parents ill, dying, so came home to help, sold our cat we had built + guy ran w/it not paying. So much for bla bla, So we back at it after several years to enjoy forever. Meanwhile our travels created our virtual platform in the building that we welcome all too. That we continue to work at.

    Nana a chief in Solomon Island would come visit us everyday, saying kara, misha , i come to talk story, so that is what we named it.

    We anchored at Suva, Fiji, the Yachtclub at great stories w/people crossing the earth. But the holding was peanut butter. My lovee walked our catamaran, as it + others masts cruised by as people walked to town, not realizing the hold was very bad. I took a bus, nice to back country where zoning did not permit metal roofs, etc. Also met a nice bug professor showing us his collection near Suva as we hiked in nice jungle mode.

    I will look at your tracks, thank you Jason!

    If anyone has some feedback on our thought below, please email me, kara; kareje@ictts.org

    We looking to see if we can relocate on a space 50′ by 50′ or so, + camp out while building a scowl, in the islands somewhere?? + May if find one buy a Wharram catamaran 35′ or so. So please let us know if see one along your path. But first we have to sell ours.

    Any chance you have seen a wood boat building village that we as a US citizen could rent some tools or even share if a local wanted also to build a scowl sailing/cargo/or fishing vessel, so we could do it together, somewhere on a quiet beach, then roll into river/bay to ocean or ocean. + Have access to get materials? + Have the means to stay long enough to finish a big share.

    The design is simple + will go fast. We cannot cut hard wood, east coast long leaf pine was a choice, but not clear what here??

    I yet to define if can then leave the boat in a hurricane hole if have to check out for visa as persons, then come back in if need more time to work on boat?? Any one w/experiences of such?

    Also if anyone knows of one wanting to live in pacific north west on a wooden boat, please check out our site to see details; www/ictts.org

    We hope to continue our networking, check us out + take part if interested.

    Ok back to more info following up on Jason`s;

    Noonsight.com says this;

    Hurricane Holes In Fiji
    last modified Apr 05, 2006 03:34 PM
    Published: 2006-04-05 15:34:26
    Countries: Fiji

    I am planning to sail to Fiji and stay for at least the allowed six months, and longer if possible. My main concern is how to protect my boat during hurricanes. I have heard of holes in the sand, or moorings up rivers, but I have not been able to find a specific web site that would address this important issue in details. Also, I have not been able to find websites about drydock facilities in Fiji (including hurricane-safe ones, as in Mexico). Any help/suggestions?

    On the island of Vanua Levu the two marinas at Savusavu (Waitui and Copra Shed) have laid down a number of strong moorings, all of which performed very well when Cyclone Ami passed through in January 2003. In the capital Suva local boats seek shelter among the creeks and mangroves close to the Tradewinds anchorage. On the west coast of Viti Levu the marina at Vuda Point offers good protection in a circular basin that can be entirely closed off by an anti-surge barrier. Boats left on the hard at this marina have their keels dropped into a trench for added protection. A cyclone shelter has also been created in a land-locked basin at Musket Cove on the island of Malololailai.

    All the above marinas are listed on noonsite.

    The best hurricane hole on the western side of Viti Levu is up the river adjacent to Lautoka, where you can tie to the mangroves. Most of the local commercial boats head up the river when a cyclone is threatening, so the trick is to get in there first. The basin at Vuda Point is questionable. I have snapped dock fixtures during a minor surge in calm weather there. During a full storm surge and direct hit, I would not want to be in the marina.

    Peter Kinsey, Sailing Adventures Fiji Ltd.

    http://www.fijisail.com

    + W/controversy another says this;

    Voyage of Yacht Zulu, MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2012

    Hurricane Evan Hits Fiji —Category 5

    We gather at the Sunset Bar for a buffet put on by Vuda Point Marina to assess the losses and our gains

    At the end of the day, exhausted and battle fatigued, we assemble under the holed roof of the Sunset Bar to a sumptuous meal put on by the Marina. Nicholas and Sam have gone the umpteenth mile for us with a little help from Marilyn, Suzie, and Melinda. We are nourished and for the most part are like happy children safe and sound.

    Adam calls for our attention and gives what news he can gather. Evan was a category 5 hurricane. Winds on the outside were 140 knots and clocked 110 knots inside the marina. Port Denarau and Musket Cove marinas are no more—non-existent. The 80-ft super yacht is on its side on rocks and mud. The town of Nadi and Lautoka are in shambles. Adam’s friend’s concrete house took flight and is no more, 3,000 people are still evacuated. Many, many houses are lost—one of which (and all his belongings) belonged to the SWEETEST Indo-Fijian chandlery store man. His house and belongings are just GONE and he, his wife, and two daughters are left without shelter. He was the one that stayed late Monday serving the needs of yachties rather than his own.

    Out beyond Vuda Point the seas are wild. An 80-plus ft super yacht and cruise ship are anchored just out of the Port of Denarau. Noble House, another huge yacht chose to anchor off the reefs at Vuda Point, rather than stay at Denarau. Other yachts are in the mangrove swamps.

    Channel 68 crackles. Somebody wants to talk to Adam. He and his crew are in the water re-securing the surge breaker that has come loose—a really dangerous job. Tarps on boats are ripping, splash shields tear on S/V Helene, and headsails unfurl and rip to shreds on an unattended boat—Tequila– next to the cat. It hurts to hear them tug and snap and briefly flap repeatedly. It is as if they cry out. The wind roars. 110 knots somebody reports? It is maelstrom. I must batten down and stay below. I ease out—“safe’ behind the iron horse dodger drawn to watch and listen to the elements unleash…but must duck below……night comes and all I ‘see’ is sound.

    All night long the sound of wind explodes. Russ goes out to secure the main sail. He is a veritable blur. We had coil-tied it down with sail cover on. But the zip has ripped open and he clings to the mast in his red jacket tying the line.

    The surge breaker is gone. Channel 68 comes alive. Calling Adam: a boat in the travel lift has lost a support and is leaning over reports Shaharazad from Coos Bay, Oregon. The tree Renegade tied to has come crashing down short of the yachts. Wayward Wind has broken loose and gouged a hole in the concrete wall and is wedged into it. It has now come down on High Aspect and the beautiful yacht Red Sky from Brisbane, Australia.

    Other staff members—the ones that worked so hard, were so loyal in working to keep our boats safe also lost some part of what little they had—in some cases. The roof went, then the kitchen then a bedroom. But when you ask how there homes fared, they smile and say good! And then expound that only the kitchen flew away or the roof or the bedroom. They look at the cup half full.

    Adam called for a moment of silence for those who had lost homes and possessions—for the most part meager. It was a deep, long silence. A time for humility for what we escaped and gratitude for what luck bestowed on us in being safe in the arms of Vuda Point Marina.

    Other observation: water peeling off reef into a wall, the eye of the hurricane, a blue crescent moon

    Michelle, from Baobab Yacht Services told us that from the vantage point of her beach home—at the onslaught of the hurricane—she saw the body of reef water peel itself off the reefs into a wall of water as the force of the first winds hit. Slowly the water released itself from the wall and receded back over the reef. What an amazing image. What a phenomenon!

    She, too, said she saw a grey light in the sky from what she thought to be the eye of the hurricane. The calm place for short respite.

    As we spoke on the lawn of Vuda point, hot tea and banana bread topping the buffet feast we looked up to see A BLUE CRESCENT MOON. A blue moon! Pale cobalt blue. It was as if it was saying: I, too, played a part in the rage.

    Hope this helps. + We appreciate any feedback any can give! Thanks + Happy sailing, kara

  3. Thank you so much for such good sharing, Jason!

    Since you did so well, i will add a few more from my searching, below but cannot verify them.

    For if we sell our sailboat in Oregon, US, we thinking to try again. For last time we sailed in we choose to go on to Australia for hurricane season. We had come from US + felt like we would just get settled in + have to move on w/weather. But i see in hindsight, good local knowledge would of helped. Life is short, we got to Auzie land + our parents ill, dying, so came home to help, sold our cat we had built + guy ran w/it not paying. So much for bla bla, So we back at it after several years to enjoy forever. Meanwhile our travels created our virtual platform in the building that we welcome all too.

    Nana a chief in Solomon Island would come visit us everyday, saying kara, misha , i come to talk story, so that is what we named it.

    We anchored at Suva, Fiji, the Yachtclub at great stories w/people crossing the earth. But the holding was peanut butter. My lovee walked our catamaran, as it + others masts cruised by as people walked to town, not realizing the hold was very bad. I took a bus, nice to back country where zoning did not permit metal roofs, etc. Also met a nice bug professor showing us his collection near Suva as we hiked in nice jungle mode.

    I will look at your tracks, thank you Jason!

    If anyone has some feedback on our thought below, please email me, kara; kareje@ictts.org

    We looking to see if we can relocate on a space 50′ by 50′ or so, + camp out while building a scowl, in the islands somewhere?? or if find a nice 35′ or so Wharram catamaran, may just buy once we sell ours.

    Any chance you have seen a wood boat building village that we as a US citizen could rent some tools or even share if a local wanted also to build a scowl sailing/cargo/or fishing vessel, so we could do it together, somewhere on a quiet beach, then roll into river/bay to ocean or ocean. + Have access to get materials? + Have the means to stay long enough to finish a big share.

    The design is simple + will go fast. We cannot cut hard wood, east coast long leaf pine was a choice, but not clear what here??

    I yet to define if can then leave the boat in a hurricane hole if have to check out for visa as persons, then come back in if need more time to work on boat?? Any one w/experiences of such?

    Also if anyone knows of one wanting to live in pacific north west on a wooden boat, please check out our site to see details; www/ictts.org

    We hope to continue our networking, check us out + take part if interested.

    Ok back to more info following up on Jason`s;

    Noonsight.com says this;

    Hurricane Holes In Fiji
    last modified Apr 05, 2006 03:34 PM
    Published: 2006-04-05 15:34:26
    Countries: Fiji

    I am planning to sail to Fiji and stay for at least the allowed six months, and longer if possible. My main concern is how to protect my boat during hurricanes. I have heard of holes in the sand, or moorings up rivers, but I have not been able to find a specific web site that would address this important issue in details. Also, I have not been able to find websites about drydock facilities in Fiji (including hurricane-safe ones, as in Mexico). Any help/suggestions?

    On the island of Vanua Levu the two marinas at Savusavu (Waitui and Copra Shed) have laid down a number of strong moorings, all of which performed very well when Cyclone Ami passed through in January 2003. In the capital Suva local boats seek shelter among the creeks and mangroves close to the Tradewinds anchorage. On the west coast of Viti Levu the marina at Vuda Point offers good protection in a circular basin that can be entirely closed off by an anti-surge barrier. Boats left on the hard at this marina have their keels dropped into a trench for added protection. A cyclone shelter has also been created in a land-locked basin at Musket Cove on the island of Malololailai.

    All the above marinas are listed on noonsite.

    The best hurricane hole on the western side of Viti Levu is up the river adjacent to Lautoka, where you can tie to the mangroves. Most of the local commercial boats head up the river when a cyclone is threatening, so the trick is to get in there first. The basin at Vuda Point is questionable. I have snapped dock fixtures during a minor surge in calm weather there. During a full storm surge and direct hit, I would not want to be in the marina.

    Peter Kinsey, Sailing Adventures Fiji Ltd.

    http://www.fijisail.com

    + W/controversy another says this;

    Voyage of Yacht Zulu, MONDAY, DECEMBER 24, 2012

    Hurricane Evan Hits Fiji —Category 5

    We gather at the Sunset Bar for a buffet put on by Vuda Point Marina to assess the losses and our gains

    At the end of the day, exhausted and battle fatigued, we assemble under the holed roof of the Sunset Bar to a sumptuous meal put on by the Marina. Nicholas and Sam have gone the umpteenth mile for us with a little help from Marilyn, Suzie, and Melinda. We are nourished and for the most part are like happy children safe and sound.

    Adam calls for our attention and gives what news he can gather. Evan was a category 5 hurricane. Winds on the outside were 140 knots and clocked 110 knots inside the marina. Port Denarau and Musket Cove marinas are no more—non-existent. The 80-ft super yacht is on its side on rocks and mud. The town of Nadi and Lautoka are in shambles. Adam’s friend’s concrete house took flight and is no more, 3,000 people are still evacuated. Many, many houses are lost—one of which (and all his belongings) belonged to the SWEETEST Indo-Fijian chandlery store man. His house and belongings are just GONE and he, his wife, and two daughters are left without shelter. He was the one that stayed late Monday serving the needs of yachties rather than his own.

    Out beyond Vuda Point the seas are wild. An 80-plus ft super yacht and cruise ship are anchored just out of the Port of Denarau. Noble House, another huge yacht chose to anchor off the reefs at Vuda Point, rather than stay at Denarau. Other yachts are in the mangrove swamps.

    Channel 68 crackles. Somebody wants to talk to Adam. He and his crew are in the water re-securing the surge breaker that has come loose—a really dangerous job. Tarps on boats are ripping, splash shields tear on S/V Helene, and headsails unfurl and rip to shreds on an unattended boat—Tequila– next to the cat. It hurts to hear them tug and snap and briefly flap repeatedly. It is as if they cry out. The wind roars. 110 knots somebody reports? It is maelstrom. I must batten down and stay below. I ease out—“safe’ behind the iron horse dodger drawn to watch and listen to the elements unleash…but must duck below……night comes and all I ‘see’ is sound.

    All night long the sound of wind explodes. Russ goes out to secure the main sail. He is a veritable blur. We had coil-tied it down with sail cover on. But the zip has ripped open and he clings to the mast in his red jacket tying the line.

    The surge breaker is gone. Channel 68 comes alive. Calling Adam: a boat in the travel lift has lost a support and is leaning over reports Shaharazad from Coos Bay, Oregon. The tree Renegade tied to has come crashing down short of the yachts. Wayward Wind has broken loose and gouged a hole in the concrete wall and is wedged into it. It has now come down on High Aspect and the beautiful yacht Red Sky from Brisbane, Australia.

    Other staff members—the ones that worked so hard, were so loyal in working to keep our boats safe also lost some part of what little they had—in some cases. The roof went, then the kitchen then a bedroom. But when you ask how there homes fared, they smile and say good! And then expound that only the kitchen flew away or the roof or the bedroom. They look at the cup half full.

    Adam called for a moment of silence for those who had lost homes and possessions—for the most part meager. It was a deep, long silence. A time for humility for what we escaped and gratitude for what luck bestowed on us in being safe in the arms of Vuda Point Marina.

    Other observation: water peeling off reef into a wall, the eye of the hurricane, a blue crescent moon

    Michelle, from Baobab Yacht Services told us that from the vantage point of her beach home—at the onslaught of the hurricane—she saw the body of reef water peel itself off the reefs into a wall of water as the force of the first winds hit. Slowly the water released itself from the wall and receded back over the reef. What an amazing image. What a phenomenon!

    She, too, said she saw a grey light in the sky from what she thought to be the eye of the hurricane. The calm place for short respite.

    As we spoke on the lawn of Vuda point, hot tea and banana bread topping the buffet feast we looked up to see A BLUE CRESCENT MOON. A blue moon! Pale cobalt blue. It was as if it was saying: I, too, played a part in the rage.

    Hope this helps. + We appreciate any feedback any can give! Thanks + Happy sailing, kara

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